Jump to content











Photo
- - - - -

Can our PE kill hardware?


  • Please log in to reply
38 replies to this topic

#26 MedEvil

MedEvil

    Platinum Member

  • .script developer
  • 7771 posts

Posted 21 September 2009 - 04:37 PM

The first pizza is ready, can anyone tell how to upload?
I constantly get the server error: unknown file type! :loleverybody:

;)

#27 was_jaclaz

was_jaclaz

    Finder

  • Advanced user
  • 7100 posts
  • Location:Gone in the mist
  •  
    Italy

Posted 21 September 2009 - 04:54 PM

The first pizza is ready, can anyone tell how to upload?


Sure, you need to FOLD it, like a TACO!
Posted Image

There is no way that a flat pizza will go through the cable, that's simple physics!

JFYI, opposite problem with binary data:
http://www.911cd.net...o...21827&st=21

:loleverybody:

jaclaz

#28 pscEx

pscEx

    Platinum Member

  • Team Reboot
  • 12707 posts
  • Location:Korschenbroich, Germany
  • Interests:What somebody else cannot do.
  •  
    European Union

Posted 21 September 2009 - 05:33 PM

I give up! :loleverybody:

I thought that this topic was 'program-technical' and should solve a technical issue.
Because I never (NEVER say NEVER!) bake a pizza in a microwave, the topic became useless for me.

BTW: @Jaclaz: The picture looks nice! Some could get intentions to try a microwave pizza. (but not me!)
Peter

#29 MedEvil

MedEvil

    Platinum Member

  • .script developer
  • 7771 posts

Posted 21 September 2009 - 05:45 PM

I already tryed packing it. Maybe the compression was to low? :loleverybody:

@psc
With this issue happening to me across so many projects, there just had to be someone else, if there were really an problem caused by our PE.
But since nobody reportet a similar case, i guess it's just a glitch in the matrix.

;)

#30 pscEx

pscEx

    Platinum Member

  • Team Reboot
  • 12707 posts
  • Location:Korschenbroich, Germany
  • Interests:What somebody else cannot do.
  •  
    European Union

Posted 21 September 2009 - 05:58 PM

@psc
With this issue happening to me across so many projects, there just had to be someone else, if there were really an problem caused by our PE.
But since nobody reportet a similar case, i guess it's just a glitch in the matrix.

Yes and no!

I remember this:

There has been a project writing into registry. You warned 'When something goes wrong, maybe local registry configuration is changed'
I agreed and 'demanded' to change. (I said that I would never add the script in question to nativeEx')

Result: (????) Maybe the script in question is unchanged until now.

Peter

#31 was_jaclaz

was_jaclaz

    Finder

  • Advanced user
  • 7100 posts
  • Location:Gone in the mist
  •  
    Italy

Posted 21 September 2009 - 06:47 PM

@psc
...and of course malformed Registry keys on local registry can blow up a PSU. :loleverybody:

Well, now everything makes sense. :cheers:

B)

jaclaz

P.S.: JFYI, the posted picture is of some tacos, a pizza looks like this:
Posted Image
that is an actual photo of the new strategy (not putting whole black olives) to avoid problems ;)

A "normal" pizza Margherita looks like this:
Posted Image

#32 MedEvil

MedEvil

    Platinum Member

  • .script developer
  • 7771 posts

Posted 21 September 2009 - 07:05 PM

I remember this:

There has been a project writing into registry. You warned 'When something goes wrong, maybe local registry configuration is changed'

The script you're talking about is saydins IE script.
And though the risc is still there that it might overwrite some settings in the local registry, this could, even just potentialy, only cause havoc to hardware from the local install not from the created PE.

:loleverybody:

#33 MedEvil

MedEvil

    Platinum Member

  • .script developer
  • 7771 posts

Posted 21 September 2009 - 07:16 PM

@jaclaz
A hot Margherita looks like that:
margherita_missoni.jpg

And here a cool one to get you down again. :loleverybody:
margarita.jpg

;)

#34 Nixie

Nixie

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 20 posts
  •  
    Italy

Posted 23 September 2009 - 11:01 AM

@jaclaz
A hot Margherita looks like that:

And here a cool one to get you down again. :cheers:

:loleverybody:


;) B) B)

I agree, I fully agree, could be different?

:cheers:

(Margherita is very nice!)

#35 Wonko the Sane

Wonko the Sane

    The Finder

  • Advanced user
  • 14950 posts
  • Location:The Outside of the Asylum (gate is closed)
  •  
    Italy

Posted 20 March 2011 - 04:17 PM

For NO apparent reason :mellow::
Posted Image

:confused1:

:mellow:
Wonko

#36 steve6375

steve6375

    Platinum Member

  • Developer
  • 7034 posts
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:computers, programming (masm,vb6,C,vbs), photography,TV,films,guitars, www.easy2boot.com
  •  
    United Kingdom

Posted 20 March 2011 - 05:11 PM

Yesterday was the second time in a year, that a PC was dead after a PE ran on it and executed the shutdown command.
Just like before, the powersupply is dead. No hissing, no poping sounds, no smells - simply dead! :confused1:
(And those were two different computers!)

That makes a total of 8 dead devices after the use of a PE + shutdown\eject in the last 3,5 years.
None failed to work, before or during PE use, but all were dead on the first start thereafter.

Also may be worth noticing or not, no dead device since i stoped using shutdown command and simply eject the CD and turn the computer off.

Did anyone notice something similar?


:mellow:


To get back to the original post, how do you know that the PSU was dead? Hint: correct answer is - I replaced it with another one and it worked - then I put back the original one after waiting 1 hr and it still did not work.

My point being that it is possible to cause a PSU to temporarily fail or a maniboard to temporarily fail. So if the system no longer turns on and then you replace the PSU and it does turn on - that does not prove that the original PSU is dead.

For instance, after a system has been killed - turn it off - unplug from mains supply and disconnect battery if a laptop - wait 1 hr - replug in mains - try to turn it on again. You will be surprised at the number of systems I have 'fixed' in this way!

Causes are:
1. CPU, North bridge or South bridge chips overheating
2. Self-healing fuse melted (but heals after 30 mins or so if power is removed) - often caused by USB 5V overload or short
3. PSU overheats or self-healing fuse in PSU melts - can be caused by imbalanced power drain causing voltage rails to go out of tolerance. For instance, if a mainboard draws 0.1Amp on 12V rail and 10Amps on 3.3V rail most AT PSUs will not regulate and can blow a fuse or simply shut down. I have seen this happen and can make it happen on certain systems (G41 chipset!) with certain software - e.g. running Win 7 WinSat DirectX test in a loop!

Of course if the PSU has an ordinary fuse, it can kill the PSU permanently!

#37 MedEvil

MedEvil

    Platinum Member

  • .script developer
  • 7771 posts

Posted 20 March 2011 - 08:59 PM

The last PSU.
- PSU did not start working again the next day.
- Checked the fuse. Fuse still fine.
- Let the PSU check at a nearby computerstore, with a special device which gets connected to all powercables and then measures all voltages.
- Device stayed dead. PSU did not give off any voltages.

:confused1:

#38 steve6375

steve6375

    Platinum Member

  • Developer
  • 7034 posts
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:computers, programming (masm,vb6,C,vbs), photography,TV,films,guitars, www.easy2boot.com
  •  
    United Kingdom

Posted 20 March 2011 - 09:01 PM

Sounds good enough to me then! Not even Standby voltages produced! Posted Image

#39 MedEvil

MedEvil

    Platinum Member

  • .script developer
  • 7771 posts

Posted 20 March 2011 - 11:30 PM

The device showed no voltages.

:confused1:




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users