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#1 ispy

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 11:37 PM

Hi all :lol: ,

Is this the cracks in the wall showing?

http://www.microsoft...oly_shakes.html

Open debate!

Mucho Regards,

ispy :thumbup:

#2 Nuno Brito

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 11:54 PM

I couldn't agree more with the writer's opinion - Vista's rival is still XP.

Why would one shift to Vista anyways?

All new computers (and especially laptops) come by default equipped with Vista and this is likely the only manner to widespread this new OS, otherwise it would become a complete flop.

Where I work there are no reasons to buy new hardware just to fit Vista specifications.

A XP box with 512Mb RAM and Celeron CPU is more than enough for daily work tasks and far cheaper than a 2Gb RAM and dual Core CPU to run Vista decently.

Having a single machine for personal use is one thing, but on companies where you're supposed to have good performance at the lowest cost (in most cases) it would simply be insane to push Vista at a time when the appropriate hardware is still not so easily affordable.

---

Unless they release a new OS capable of being less resource hungry I won't be upgrading anywhere soon.

:lol:

#3 TheHive

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 12:20 AM

Hopefully Windows 7 will do a better job. Might endup called Windows XP 2 and use less resources.
All we could Have another bloated OS with option out.

Another reason for some people to upgrade was because some of the new added programs to Vista are not supposively XP compatible. If programmers can make programs XP, Vista compatible, then new DirectX and other programs can be XP/Vista compatible too.

Microsoft should offer a leaner Vista and I bet more people would want that then to much bloat slowing the Vista Ready PC's.

#4 was_jaclaz

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 08:13 AM

I guess the main point is the "multimedia" experience.

At the office, noone wants/need people to experience any multimedia.

The basic uses of a PC at work (that cover 99.99% of uses) are :
1) Write a letter or report. (Read MS Word)
2) Create a simple spreadsheet (Read MS Excel)
3) Read/send PLAIN TEXT e-mails (Read MS Outlook Express)
4) Do point 3) above and manage calendar/agenda (Read MS Outlook)
5) If in a technical company draw or access technical drawings (Read Autocad)
6) Run a (possibly DOS) accounting program
7) Access documentation (Read Adobe acrobat reader)
8) Very limited Internet access (read MS Internet Explorer)

The above has substantially been the same since the PC started to have enough power to actually do any of the above chores faster than by hand, let's say after the common adoption of hard disks (PC's with two floppies actually were SLOWER than doing it manually and half of the time the floppy could never be read again).

Watching a movie or animation, playing songs, having a couple of instant messaging apps running in the background, browsing the internet reading blogs, downloading from peer-to-peer and later burning on CD/DVD possibly illegal files are all tasks that a "normal" employer does not particularly like his/her employees to "entertain" with.

They are all activities that are very nice to indulge with in the spare time, but not while (supposedly) working.

The PC is (or should be) a working tool, just like a tape calculator or a pen is, to do whatever is needed to do for the company or office, not an "experience".

The above of course does not apply to certain categories, like designers, engineers, and the like, that do need all the power they can get.


jaclaz

#5 ispy

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 09:03 AM

Hi all :lol: ,

What do you think this means for Linux potentially?

Regards,

ispy :thumbup:

#6 Nuno Brito

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 05:30 PM

Jaclaz described very well the reasons why companies object to upgrading so soon.

There still a good way to go until free Office solutions can replace the MS supremacy.

On my case, I tried replacing on some machine the installed MS Office with Open Office and the reactions were quite agressive from some users.

In most cases it was fear because this was an Office application with different icons from what people knew and also because a few documents would not appear formatted the same way as done on MS Word.

Apart from that - the reaction was fairly positive and I even convinced a lot of people to use Open Office instead of a warez version of MS Office (don't think anyone at my workplace has a valid license for MS Office since it is simply easier to add the serial key snatched from the web)

The used argument was the truth - there was a completely free alternative to MS Office and therefore there was no need for using warez in the first place.

---------------------

There are however some serious problems with Open Office - the MS Office (2003) still beats in excellence when it comes to get the work done, so I seriously hope one we can see more and more people improving OpenOffice so that it can become a sort of firefox to beat the punch on IE.

------------

The idea of all this work - was to slowly move onto ubuntu based boxes. If people get more familiar with Open Office and Firefox then it would likely mean a quick jump onto a Linux environment and say goodbye to worries about USB viruses and such.

Unfortunately it still not possible to work this way and MS software is still the only one that gathers trust from everyday users.

I'm still crossing my fingers to see it happen one day! :lol:




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