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WOF_Compress

ntfs windows compression wof

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#51 alacran

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Posted 4 weeks ago

@alacran

 

EDIT:

I don't see the same exclusion list in wimlib-clc  :unsure:

Compression exclusions list used by wimlib-clc & Dism when making a *.wim or *.esd file

 

Open wimlib-clc and go to Extras>Install files on temporary directory and select install Wimscrip.ini to wimlib-clc folder, then open it and you can find in it that [CompressionExclusionList], see attached picture.

 

It is embeded on wimlib-imagex, but you can extact it with wimlib-clc so you are able to take a look or modify it if required.

 

Wimscrip.ini is a config file similar to WimBootCompress.ini but it is used on standard (non wimboot) captures.

 

Spoiler

 

alacran

Attached Thumbnails

  • Wimscrip.png


#52 wimb

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Posted 4 weeks ago

Open wimlib-clc and go to Extras>Install files on temporary directory and select install Wimscrip.ini to wimlib-clc folder, then open it and you can find in it that [CompressionExclusionList], see attached picture.

 

 

Thanks for the Info on How to find and use that hidden feature.

In my case as shown below, there is no [CompressionExclusionList] Section

 

Spoiler

 

 

In WOF_Compress then in my file makebt\Compress_Exclude.txt you must specify Files by filename, pathname or part of path\filename.

That means that wildcards as *  and ? in patterns like *.mp3 cannot be used.



#53 antonino61

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Posted 4 weeks ago

whole directories can, though, can they not?



#54 wimb

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Posted 4 weeks ago

whole directories can, though, can they not?

 

Sure they can as always ....



#55 antonino61

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Posted 4 weeks ago

so, what I tried to imply was: instead of *.mp3, one first sees the directories that contain them and then adds \blablabla in the exclusion lists to obtain the same effect.

nino



#56 wimb

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Posted 4 weeks ago

Yes you might Select folder Windows for Compression.

 

If you have in Compress_Exclude.txt lines like

\System32\drivers\
\System32\config\

Then all the drivers and all the registry files in folder config will Not be WOF Compressed.

 

In Compress_Exclude.txt you must specify Files by filename, pathname or part of path\filename

You cannot use wildcards as * Or ?



#57 alacran

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Posted 4 weeks ago

Thanks for the Info on How to find and use that hidden feature.

In my case as shown below, there is no [CompressionExclusionList] Section

 

 

In WOF_Compress then in my file makebt\Compress_Exclude.txt you must specify Files by filename, pathname or part of path\filename.

That means that wildcards as *  and ? in patterns like *.mp3 cannot be used.

 

Agree with you, there is no more  [CompressionExclusionList] Section on the Wimscrip.ini of wimlib-clc.

 

But it was there, maybe I copied mine long time ago, but you can see it is there on this MS article about DISM Configuration List and WimScript.ini Files, see: https://msdn.microso...4(v=vs.85).aspx

 

Default Exclusion List

By default, the DISM.exe tool will exclude the following files.

[ExclusionList]
\$ntfs.log
\hiberfil.sys
\pagefile.sys
\swapfile.sys
\System Volume Information
\RECYCLER
\Windows\CSC

[CompressionExclusionList]
*.mp3
*.zip
*.cab
\WINDOWS\inf\*.pnf

 

About your Compress_Exclude.txt, if it uses another syntax, then we will have to live with it.

 

See you latter my friend.

 

alacran



#58 wimb

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Posted 4 weeks ago

Agree with you, there is no more  [CompressionExclusionList] Section on the Wimscrip.ini of wimlib-clc.

 

But it was there, maybe I copied mine long time ago, but you can see it is there on this MS article about DISM Configuration List and WimScript.ini Files, see: https://msdn.microso...4(v=vs.85).aspx

 

Thanks for the interesting Link on WimScript.ini files  :)

 

I will try to make WOF_Compress compatible with such WimScript.ini file with [CompressionExclusionList] section.

 

Also I will make option to use Compress_FileList.txt file with List of files to be processed by WOF_Compress



#59 wimb

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Posted 3 weeks ago

I will try to make WOF_Compress compatible with such WimScript.ini file with [CompressionExclusionList] section.

 

Also I will make option to use Compress_FileList.txt file with List of files to be processed by WOF_Compress

 

Done  :)  

 

WOF_Compress Version 3.3 is on line - Download encrypted with password = bootwimb

 

Two types of Exclusion can be used in WOF_Compress program using makebt\Compress_Exclude.ini file with [CompressionExclusionList] section
1 - Filenames with extension that may contain wildcards like * and/or ? but cannot contain a backslash
2 - Path\Filename or parts of path\filename that must contain a backslash and can have trailing wildcard * Or *.* but cannot contain ? or * on other place
; Use Leading ; for lines with comment
 
WOF_Compress Program will default use file makebt\Compress_Exclude.ini as exclude file for compression
WofCompress.exe Tool of JFX will default use file makebt\WimBootReCompress.ini as exclude file for compression
In both cases a Custom.ini file is selectable to overrule the default selection
 
WOF_Compress Program and WofCompress.exe Tool of JFX give now good comparable results
 
WOF32-2019-05-23_191152.png == WOF32-2019-05-23_192033.png == WOF32-2019-05-23_192603.png == WOF32-2019-05-23_193535.png
 
The file makebt\Compress_FileList.txt or a custom.txt file can be used as FileList to process files ocurring on selected Target Drive
Each valid entry should start with a backslash folowed by full path and filename with extension
Leading ; can be used for lines with comment
 
:cheers:
 
How to make FileList

- Open admin command window at root of Drive C:\ Or at root of Mounted VHD drive and goto root by typing cd \ and then type

cd \
dir /b /s /on /a-d >C:\dir-FileList.txt

 

How to make Folder List in given directory

- Open admin command window at C:\Windows\system32> and type
dir /b /on /ad >C:\folders-system32.txt
 

  • erwan.l and alacran like this

#60 antonino61

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Posted 3 weeks ago

btw, only thinking to myself, ... how about enabling exfat in windows for all, including wimboot, ramboot, and wofcompress? can it be done successfully? exfat is fast!!!



#61 wimb

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Posted 3 weeks ago

WOF_Compress Version 3.3 is on line - Download encrypted with password = bootwimb

 

makebt\Compress_Exclude.ini file can have trailing wildcard * Or *.* but cannot contain ? or * on other place

 

Change made for better correspondence with makebt\WimBootReCompress.ini

 

Two types of Exclusion can be used in WOF_Compress program using makebt\Compress_Exclude.ini file with [CompressionExclusionList] section

1 - Filenames with extension that may contain wildcards like * and/or ? but cannot contain a backslash
2 - Path\Filename or parts of path\filename that must contain a backslash and can have trailing wildcard * Or *.* but cannot contain ? or * on other place
; Use Leading ; for lines with comment


#62 antonino61

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Posted 3 weeks ago

Yet ANOTHER BIG TRIBUTE to the Flying Dutchman - well, I had nothing better to do than to carry out a little informal test with the same hardware architecture (so Wonko, rest assured, it's objective; btw, I have not yet got around to opening a new topic, otherwise I woulda seen to it that this post be put in the right place). Getting back to the tribute, I said to myself, all this enthusiasm about wimbooting, rambooting, wimrambooting, wimrambambooting and what not, as Benigni or Marinetti woulda said, might have distracted our minds from normal vhd booting. So, what I did was gimagex'ing my current wim into an ad-hoc vhd to the full (I normally run my pc with both wim and vhd lzx-compressed). What gimagex rightly yilded was an uncompressed vhd working content. I booted off this vhd and took note of the booting time; then I wofcompressed the vhd in the same fashion as my normal booting combo (lzx), booted off it and took note of the booting time; then I shrunk the wofcompressed vhd to a reasonable size (25% over used space), booted off it and took note of the booting time; well, these are my findings: all of these bootings took just one second (or less) longer than wimboot. So at least with my hardware architecture, negligible time diffferences but still great space-saving gains! Long Live Wimbooting! It would even live all the longer if we got g4d or any other loader to outperform MS bootmgr, which seems to be the only glitch. all the rest runs fine, like a well-oiled machine.



#63 wimb

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Posted 3 weeks ago

@antonino61

 

Thanks for testing WOF_Compress to compress files inside mounted VHD.

I repeated your experiment and can confirm that such VHD is booting OK in about the same boottime.



#64 antonino61

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Posted 3 weeks ago

Well, we can then certify the operational start of a wimboot era. now the only things left for me to think over out loud are bootmgr and exfat.

bootmgr is about 5 seconds faster than g4d, if I remember correctly from previous comparative tests weeks ago. and I am sure some procedures and checks that it undergoes during the booting are superfluous (I remember discussing the thing with alacrán, who seemed to be only concerned with the prebooting stage, namely reducing the time it took as far as the rotating dotted circle underneath the 4-square logo at system loading; he reasonably said "of course, since from then on the procedures are beyond my control"). this is to mean that we need to know what bootmgr does or does not to make loading faster than g4d (I mean as filedisk, not ramdisk) - so, I do not know how long a way we are from making booting all the quicker.

exfat, because I once heard Wonko say that it is the quickest filesystem (he was referring to imdisk for temps and/or swapfile (the latter bein not necessary in my case)). I actually tried it and it seemed faster (don't know if it was just a perception, though). I also read that exfat does not pester the user with file and folder permission issues, even though it is less flexible with partition resizing than ntfs. the questions are:

can windows boot off an exfat partition? if it can, why should wim_boot and/or wofcompress not include exfat partitioning?

does exfat allow compressing at all? 

ps.: sorry about any possible technical nonsense on my part.



#65 erwan.l

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Posted 3 weeks ago

I may be wrong but I believe you cannot compress file using WOF on exfat volumes.

Actually, I believe WOF only applies to NTFS volumes.

 

About installing windows to exfat, I am not sure the windows installer supports this.

And even if manually working around stage 1, I am still not sure if windows can boot on exfat (can it?).

Exfat seems to be mostly optimized for flash and usb devices but not so popular for other purposes and is criticized for its patents (Microsoft?).

 

Interesting thread from our friend Akeo here about exfat vs ntfs.



#66 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 3 weeks ago

exfat, because I once heard Wonko say that it is the quickest filesystem ... (etc.)

 

Wonko cannot have possibly said that.

 

He may have said that exFAT (like all FAT based filesystems) are simpler than NTFS, and usually (but not always) they may be quicker but definitely he cannot have said the exFAT is the quickest.

 

So if you heard him saying that, he was drunk :w00t: (or you were drunk :whistling:, or both were drunk :cheers: ).

 

No, it is not a good idea, actually it is a terrible idea to use exFAT, for some of the reasons Akeo/pbatard explained in the posts referenced by erwan.l and for a number of other reasons.

 

Newer BOOTMGR versions may (no actual idea if they do) support exFAT, if they don't there is simply no way to boot off an exFAT volume 

 

:duff:

Wonko



#67 antonino61

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Posted 3 weeks ago

doubs cleared, Wonko is right again, but I swear I heard Wonko's comment as limited to imdisk, not generalized, as he interpreted I said. Anyway he and erwan are right again: tried exfat and it takes some more space and indefinitely more booting time, so much so that I gave it a 3-finger-salute and reboot in ram and here I am. again Long Live the Flying Dutchman! as for the second doubt, I wanna paraphrase Alexander Pope and say that angels rush in where fools fear to thread. What I mean is that I long for a speedup of the bootup process, which again I deem as being the only thing that is slow here.

nino



#68 wimb

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Posted 3 weeks ago

Booting slow ?  What is your boottime actually ?

 

VHD WIMBOOT - Windows boottime

For me from loaded into RAMDISK until appearance of desktop picture takes 10 sec

BIOS mode Booting as FILEDISK - from selection in Boot Manager menu until apearance of desktop picture takes 10 sec

UEFI Secure mode Booting as FILEDISK - from selection in Boot Manager menu until apearance of desktop picture takes 25 sec

 

Above is given the Windows boottime, but it also takes additional time from switch on to arrive at Boot Manager menu.

This hardware boottime is in my case 20 sec that must be added to the Windows boottime to get the Total boottime.



#69 antonino61

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Posted 3 weeks ago

about the same here as your last timing 24-26secs but it is bios mode in my case. Am I doing something wrong? I am not sure I understand you when u say uefi. how can u boot into uefi as filedisk and alternately ramboot ur system as the first data (10secs) show? U probably mean bootmgr in the third timing as opposed to g4d filedisk booting in ur second timing? if so, in any case I have a noticeable difference between g4d as filedisk and bootmgr, not so huge as ur 15-second difference, though. so, let us compare the settings.

my timings are: bootmgr 25-26secs, g4d ramboot 30secs, g4d filedisk let me check it out back again.

in a bit, then

nino 



#70 antonino61

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Posted 3 weeks ago

g4d filedisk yields a too-many-fragments error and won't boot. btw now I know what u mean by uefi booting. if the bootmgr defaults to one of the vhd's instead of defaulting to bootloader menu. well, not much of a difference here, though.



#71 wimb

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Posted 3 weeks ago

For FILEDISK booting I never use Grub4dos, but always Boot Manager menu using bootmgr.

 

For my computer I can in F8 menu select to boot in BIOS mode Or to boot in UEFI mode with Boot Manager menu.

Grub4dos is then  selectable only in BIOS mode Boot Manager menu.

All boot options are made by VHD_WIMBOOT program



#72 antonino61

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Posted 3 weeks ago

ah ok then. parallel to u, i do not have much difference between uefi and bios with bootmgr, but it still takes 25-26secs

my architecture is

Computer Type ACPI x64-based PC

Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro
OS Service Pack -
Internet Explorer 11.1.17763.0 (IE 11.0.47)
DirectX DirectX 12.0
Computer Name DESKTOP-U0ENMO3
User Name Antonino
Logon Domain DESKTOP-U0ENMO3
Date / Time 2019-05-26 / 23:16
 
Motherboard
CPU Type 10-Core Intel Core i9-7900X, 4300 MHz (43 x 100)
Motherboard Name Gigabyte X299 Aorus Ultra Gaming Pro  (5 PCI-E x16, 3 M.2, 8 DDR4 DIMM, Audio, Gigabit LAN)
Motherboard Chipset Intel Kaby Point X299, Intel Skylake-X
System Memory 63754 MB  (DDR4 SDRAM)
DIMM-A1: Corsair Vengeance LPX CMK32GX4M2A2400C16 16 GB DDR4-2400 DDR4 SDRAM  (20-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (19-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (18-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (17-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (16-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (15-15-15-37 @ 1126 MHz)  (14-14-14-35 @ 1051 MHz)  (13-13-13-32 @ 975 MHz)  (12-12-12-30 @ 900 MHz)  (11-11-11-27 @ 825 MHz)  (10-10-10-25 @ 750 MHz)  (9-9-9-22 @ 675 MHz)
DIMM-B1: Corsair Vengeance LPX CMK32GX4M2A2400C16 16 GB DDR4-2400 DDR4 SDRAM  (20-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (19-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (18-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (17-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (16-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (15-15-15-37 @ 1126 MHz)  (14-14-14-35 @ 1051 MHz)  (13-13-13-32 @ 975 MHz)  (12-12-12-30 @ 900 MHz)  (11-11-11-27 @ 825 MHz)  (10-10-10-25 @ 750 MHz)  (9-9-9-22 @ 675 MHz)
DIMM-C1: Corsair Vengeance LPX CMK32GX4M2A2400C16 16 GB DDR4-2400 DDR4 SDRAM  (20-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (19-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (18-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (17-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (16-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (15-15-15-37 @ 1126 MHz)  (14-14-14-35 @ 1051 MHz)  (13-13-13-32 @ 975 MHz)  (12-12-12-30 @ 900 MHz)  (11-11-11-27 @ 825 MHz)  (10-10-10-25 @ 750 MHz)  (9-9-9-22 @ 675 MHz)
DIMM-D1: Corsair Vengeance LPX CMK32GX4M2A2400C16 16 GB DDR4-2400 DDR4 SDRAM  (20-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (19-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (18-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (17-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (16-16-16-39 @ 1200 MHz)  (15-15-15-37 @ 1126 MHz)  (14-14-14-35 @ 1051 MHz)  (13-13-13-32 @ 975 MHz)  (12-12-12-30 @ 900 MHz)  (11-11-11-27 @ 825 MHz)  (10-10-10-25 @ 750 MHz)  (9-9-9-22 @ 675 MHz)
BIOS Type AMI (11/05/2018)
 
Display
Video Adapter GeForce GTX 1070  (8 GB)
Video Adapter GeForce GTX 1070  (8 GB)
Video Adapter GeForce GTX 1070  (8 GB)
Video Adapter GeForce GTX 1070  (8 GB)
3D Accelerator nVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070
Monitor Samsung SyncMaster U28E590  [28" LCD]  (HTPJ601538)
 
Multimedia
Audio Adapter nVIDIA GP104 HDMI/DP @ nVIDIA GP104 - High Definition Audio Controller
Audio Adapter Realtek ALC1220 @ Intel Kaby Point PCH - High Definition Audio Controller (Audio, Voice, Speech)
 
Storage
Storage Controller Intel® C600+/C220+ series chipset SATA RAID Controller
Storage Controller Microsoft Storage Spaces Controller
Storage Controller Standard NVM Express Controller
Storage Controller SVBus Virtual SCSI Host Adapter
Disk Drive CT1000MX500SSD4  (1000 GB, SATA-III)
Disk Drive CT1000P1SSD8  (1000 GB, PCI-E 3.0 x4)
Disk Drive Intel Raid Volume  (849 GB)
Disk Drive Intel Raid Volume  (884 GB)
Disk Drive SVBus Virtual Hard Disk SCSI RAM Device  (1473 MB)
SMART Hard Disks Status OK
 
Partitions
C: (NTFS) 1466 MB (458 MB free)
D: (NTFS) 931.5 GB (312.3 GB free)
E: (NTFS) 931.5 GB (346.4 GB free)
F: (NTFS) 849.5 GB (81.6 GB free)
G: (NTFS) 884.9 GB (124.5 GB free)
Z: (NTFS) 8190 MB (8026 MB free)
Total Size 3606.9 GB (873.0 GB free)
 
Input
Keyboard HID Keyboard Device
Keyboard HID Keyboard Device
Keyboard HID Keyboard Device
Keyboard HID Keyboard Device
Keyboard Standard PS/2 Keyboard
Mouse HID-compliant Optical Wheel Mouse
 
Network
Primary IP Address 192.168.1.3
Primary MAC Address AE-B6-D0-1E-7B-4B
Network Adapter Bluetooth Device (Personal Area Network)
Network Adapter Intel® Ethernet Connection (2) I219-V  (192.168.1.3)
Network Adapter Killer Wireless-n/a/ac 1535 Wireless Network Adapter
Network Adapter Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter #2
Network Adapter Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter
 
Peripherals
Printer Canon MG2900 series Printer
Printer Fax
Printer Microsoft Print to PDF
USB3 Controller ASMedia ASM2142 USB 3.1 xHCI Controller
USB3 Controller ASMedia ASM2142 USB 3.1 xHCI Controller
USB3 Controller Intel Kaby Point PCH - USB 3.1 xHCI Host Controller
USB Device Cinergy T2 Stick HD
USB Device Generic SuperSpeed USB Hub
USB Device Generic USB Hub
USB Device Generic USB Hub
USB Device Generic USB Hub
USB Device Qualcomm Atheros QCA61x4 Bluetooth
USB Device TeVii S662 BDA DVB-S2
USB Device Trust Webcam
USB Device Trust Webcam
USB Device USB Composite Device
USB Device USB Composite Device
USB Device USB Input Device
USB Device USB Input Device
USB Device USB Input Device
 
DMI
DMI BIOS Vendor American Megatrends Inc.
DMI BIOS Version F4g
DMI System Manufacturer Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd.
DMI System Product X299 AORUS Ultra Gaming Pro
DMI System Version Default string
DMI System Serial Number Default string
DMI System UUID E002D503-5E042405-2D06BD07-00080009
DMI Motherboard Manufacturer Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd.
DMI Motherboard Product X299 AORUS Ultra Gaming Pro-CF
DMI Motherboard Version x.x
DMI Motherboard Serial Number Default string
DMI Chassis Manufacturer Default string
DMI Chassis Version Default string
DMI Chassis Serial Number Default string
DMI Chassis Asset Tag Default string
DMI Chassis Type Desktop Case


#73 wimb

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Posted 3 weeks ago

What is your normal boottime for booting Win 10 as installed on internal SSD ?

In my case it is  8 sec (from selection in Boot Manager menu until apearance of desktop picture) - Windows boottime

The time from switch on until appearance of Boot Manager menu is 20 sec. - Hardware boottime 

So the total boottime is 20 + 8 = 28 sec.

 

In case of UEFI VHD WIMBOOT then I have Windows boottime of 25 sec, much longer than thee BIOS case bootime of 10 sec for VHD WIMBOOT.

I just discovered the reason: it is the unsigned svbus driver that requires to use F8 menu to allow unsigned drivers.

When I remove the svbus driver then my UEFI VHD WIMBOOT Windows boottime is reduced to 10 sec and equal to the BIOS mode case of booting.

So allowing the unsigned svbus driver takes an extra 15 sec without seeing the orb in case of UEFI booting  ;)

 

Do you have card reader drives ?

Does it make any difference when you disconnect external hardware like printer  Or TV tuner Or ....?

Does it make any difference when you boot without Network connection (disable LAN and disable auto WiFi connect) ?

 

On what device is your VHD + WIM located ?

Is Windows Update complete ?

 

How much time do you have from selection in BootManager menu until the orb occurs ?

In my normal case it is 1 second, but in UEFI case with allowing unsigned drivers via F8 menu it is 15 sec  :frusty:



#74 antonino61

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Posted 3 weeks ago

my timing from bootmanager selection to the appearance of the desktop picture is 24secs.

when I do uefi boot the F8 button is not necessary, as the svbus driver is testsigned.

card reader drives i do not have.

I will try disconnecting tv tuners and printers as soon as I can.

how do I disable LAN?

how do I disable auto WIFI connect? 



#75 wimb

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Posted 3 weeks ago

 

how do I disable LAN?

how do I disable auto WIFI connect? 

Go to Network settings

 

disable LAN via - Adapter Change Options > Right click on Ethernet > select Disable

WiFi adapter - uncheck the checkbox for auto connect

 

In BIOS mode booting I also don't need to use F8 menu,

but in UEFI mode I still need to allow unsigned drivers for SVBus driver via F8 menu allthough Testsigning is On.

 

Gradually we are going Off Topic and discuss here anything but WOF_Compress  :frusty:







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