Jump to content











Photo
- - - - -

Windows 10 pro for contract worker


Best Answer Wonko the Sane , 18 March 2019 - 09:59 AM

As long as they "spy" on your work it may be fine.

The issue may be that IF there is any spying it is hard to separate the work from the personal activities.

The rule of the thumb (or common sense solution) is - strangely enough  - to keep them separate, by using a separate computer.

 

In any case - set aside the spying or the not spying - I find "queer" the requirement for Pro (vs. Home), it is not that there are that many differences, maybe they are preoccupied by automatic updates? :dubbio:

 

:duff:

Wonko

Go to the full post


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 gamora77

gamora77
  • Banned
  • 5 posts
  •  
    India

Posted 18 March 2019 - 09:21 AM

Posting with throwaway for protection.

I own my own windows 10 home edition. But I am being contracted by a company that is requiring that I upgrade to windows 10 pro. They also want me to use a new company email address they have set up for me to use during the contracted work. They want me to send them the product key of the windows 10 pro license and use the company email to purchase the upgrade...

Are they trying to spy on my work? What level of access can they get with the product key and email? Is this something I can disable on my end? I feel uncomfortable saying no to the upgrade, but I am equally uncomfortable with them having any sort of access.

Does anyone here have insight?



#2 Wonko the Sane

Wonko the Sane

    The Finder

  • Advanced user
  • 15485 posts
  • Location:The Outside of the Asylum (gate is closed)
  •  
    Italy

Posted 18 March 2019 - 09:59 AM   Best Answer

As long as they "spy" on your work it may be fine.

The issue may be that IF there is any spying it is hard to separate the work from the personal activities.

The rule of the thumb (or common sense solution) is - strangely enough  - to keep them separate, by using a separate computer.

 

In any case - set aside the spying or the not spying - I find "queer" the requirement for Pro (vs. Home), it is not that there are that many differences, maybe they are preoccupied by automatic updates? :dubbio:

 

:duff:

Wonko



#3 Rootman

Rootman

    Frequent Member

  • Advanced user
  • 365 posts
  • Location:USA

Posted 18 March 2019 - 10:56 AM

Pro offers some things that Home does not, I personally would not use Home for anything.  There is nothing inherent in Pro that allows spying.

 

Chances are they will want you to surrender the Pro version after you complete your work, although HOW this would be accomplished is a good question. Get a good backup program, I use Macrium Reflect, there's a free version although I think the paid version is well worth it. Get the backup program, install it, create a recovery media on a USB stick and test to make sure it works.  Then take a complete backup of your home OS as it stands and store it.  Install the the Pro version and do your work.  If at the end of your work they want you to STOP using the Pro, or you feel that the OS has been compromised too much by their software, then restore your OS back to your HOME version using the rescue media and backed up HOME OS.

 

Just remember, ANYTHING that you added to the PRO version will NOT be on the HOME, so keep track of stuff you install or upgrade during the interim, you'll have to do it again once the HOME is restored. 



#4 gamora77

gamora77
  • Banned
  • 5 posts
  •  
    India

Posted 23 March 2019 - 07:52 PM



 

Posting with throwaway for protection.

I own my own windows 10 home edition. But I am being contracted by a company that is requiring that I upgrade to windows 10 pro. They also want me to use a new company email address they have set up for me to use during the contracted work. They want me to send them the product key of the windows 10 pro license and use the company email to purchase the upgrade...

Are they trying to spy on my work? What level of access can they get with the product key and email? Is this something I can disable on my end? I feel uncomfortable saying no to the upgrade, but I am equally uncomfortable with them having any sort of access.

Does anyone here have insight?Xvideos Xnxx Chaturbate

 

 

 

 

thankyou so much!!!



#5 quarky42

quarky42

    Member

  • Members
  • 38 posts
  •  
    United States

Posted 10 June 2020 - 03:55 PM

Although too late to be of help for the Original Poster, I add this thought in case it helps someone else in a similar situation.

 

If your computer is powerful enough (Good CPU, Large amount of RAM, and a decent SSD is where I would start) then using one of the HyperV alternative like VirtualBox to run an installation of Windows as if it were an application itself on top of the host operating system would be a good way to use one computer and keep your work separate from your non-work use of that computer.   The Virtual version of Windows would only run when you launch it, and it would run on top of the host operating system.  

 

Depending on your work and how computing intensive it is, this may or may not be a good solution.  I have worked with HyperV (Windows 10 Pro's version of computing Virtualization) as well as a couple others and found them to be a lot faster than they used to be.  Part of that is due to Virtualization being turned on in the bios AND the specific processor on the computer having some Virtualization features that help speed up the virtual OS running on top of the host OS.   If nothing else, this would be a good option to consider in a similar situation.



#6 Wonko the Sane

Wonko the Sane

    The Finder

  • Advanced user
  • 15485 posts
  • Location:The Outside of the Asylum (gate is closed)
  •  
    Italy

Posted 11 June 2020 - 06:55 AM

Although too late to be of help for the Original Poster, I add this thought in case it helps someone else in a similar situation.

 

If your computer is powerful enough (Good CPU, Large amount of RAM, and a decent SSD is where I would start) then using one of the HyperV alternative like VirtualBox to run an installation of Windows as if it were an application itself on top of the host operating system would be a good way to use one computer and keep your work separate from your non-work use of that computer.   The Virtual version of Windows would only run when you launch it, and it would run on top of the host operating system.  

 

Depending on your work and how computing intensive it is, this may or may not be a good solution.  I have worked with HyperV (Windows 10 Pro's version of computing Virtualization) as well as a couple others and found them to be a lot faster than they used to be.  Part of that is due to Virtualization being turned on in the bios AND the specific processor on the computer having some Virtualization features that help speed up the virtual OS running on top of the host OS.   If nothing else, this would be a good option to consider in a similar situation.

The original poster is a SPAMmer that quoted himself adding a link to (presumably p0rn) video sites.

 

He needs not any help.

 

Posted only to avoid that someone else wanting to help loses time.

 

:duff:

Wonko




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users