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Patches with CPU detection (UPDATE BLOCKING)

update blocking

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#1 alacran

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Posted 4 weeks ago

 

KB4012218 and KB4012219 are patches with CPU detection If you recently bought a new PC or assembled one yourself with a new CPU and decided to install Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 on it, you will not be able to update these operating systems. Microsoft is not going to deliver updates for you any more. This was recently announced. A newly released set of patches brings the CPU detection feature to Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.

 

http://winaero.com/b...-cpu-detection/

 

Both updates will prevent your operating system from downloading and installing updates if you have one of the following CPUs:

 

Intel seventh (7th)-generation processors (Kaby Lake) or later

AMD "Bristol Ridge" (Seventh generation) or newer

Qualcomm "8996"

 

You may see some comments here: http://www.msfn.org/...-cpu-detection/

 

And also How to fix this blocking: http://www.msfn.org/...comment=1138003 & https://github.com/zeffy/kb4012218-19

 

I have read that if you uninstall this patches you have full acess to WU again, but then after the next month update this blocking is going to be installed again.

 

alacran



#2 dencorso

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Posted 4 weeks ago

Since this is sure a very useful patch, and wuaueng.dll is sure to be updated many times in the short-term future (maybe even monthly) it would be great if someone created a generic adaptive patcher (like LvlLord's classic patcher to tcpip.sys, which continues to work fine to this day) to take care of this issue, update after update. Besides being fully legal, such a tool ought to remain useful for a long time, obviating the need to create a new xdelta patch for every new version of wuaueng.dll, following each new release. Just my 2¢, of course...


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#3 Wonko the Insane

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Posted 3 weeks ago

This patch will be quite useful for me, since the new custom-built gaming laptop I'm ordering will have the desktop version of the Kabylake CPU. I plan to try installing 7 and 8.1 on it, although I'll ultimately go with 10. I expect to receive it sometime in the next few weeks, it's still being built and tested.

#4 erwan.l

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Posted 3 weeks ago

As highlited here

Caveats

You have to apply a new patch whenever wuaueng.dll gets updated.
SFC scan errors will most likely occur as it will believe the integrity of the system has been compromised.

A resident memory patcher as opposed to a file patcher would be ideal.

 

Get a handle to (the right) svchost.exe process, locate wuaueng.dll module, writeprocessmemory...

I could have volunteered for this but I dont have modern hardware :)

 

Before testing/pocing the above, as the process is similar to game trainers, one could test this scenario with cheatengine.



#5 Wonko the Insane

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Posted 2 weeks ago

@erwan.l: Couldn't MS just check the memory regions to see if something has been tampered with? People who use Cheat Engine in online games oftentimes get busted because anti-cheat tech checks for the memory modifications you mention. Like Steam's VAC, PunkBuster, BattlEye, Denuvo, etc.



#6 erwan.l

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Posted 2 weeks ago

@erwan.l: Couldn't MS just check the memory regions to see if something has been tampered with? People who use Cheat Engine in online games oftentimes get busted because anti-cheat tech checks for the memory modifications you mention. Like Steam's VAC, PunkBuster, BattlEye, Denuvo, etc.

 

Hi Wonko,

 

Many game providers indeed check for this as writing to memory is the preferred way to cheat.

However, windows itself should be ok with that.

 

 

Writeprocessmemory is an api provided by MS itself (kernel32.dll) and is still used by many tools out there.

 

Regards,

Erwan






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