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DIY Data Recovery worth the risk?

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#1 DustinDeTorres

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Posted 2 weeks ago

Is DIY data recovery safe? Recover data from damaged storage device is very sensitive. Trust me, I have been working for this 9 years now.

Read my latest article about DIY Data Recovery.



#2 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 2 weeks ago

Is DIY data recovery safe? Recover data from damaged storage device is very sensitive. Trust me, I have been working for this 9 years now.
Read my latest article about DIY Data Recovery.

Out of curiosity, is that you (or one of your technicians) in the picture (taken while disassembling a hard disk) here:
http://blog.brisbane...a-recovery.html
https://1.bp.blogspo...0481_l-2015.jpg

or is it one of the usual (and useless) stock photos?

I surely trust you, 9 years of experience cannot be ignored and the blog posts have a few really precious pearls of wisdom, a couple of samples/highlights:

 

In all of these situations, an expert has a much greater chance of finding what you need, without damaging your computer.

 

 

If the data or files you’ve lost are worth something to you in monetary terms, it suggests you really need them found.

 

Our experience and expertise means we know where to look for your data, in a way that doesn’t damage your laptop or PC.

 

It's good to know that - should a disaster happen -  expert people hopefully capable of recovering data do exist. :)

 

:duff:
Wonko
 


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#3 DustinDeTorres

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Posted 2 weeks ago

Out of curiosity, is that you (or one of your technicians) in the picture (taken while disassembling a hard disk) here:
http://blog.brisbane...a-recovery.html
https://1.bp.blogspo...0481_l-2015.jpg

or is it one of the usual (and useless) stock photos?

I surely trust you, 9 years of experience cannot be ignored and the blog posts have a few really precious pearls of wisdom, a couple of samples/highlights:

 

 

It's good to know that - should a disaster happen -  expert people hopefully capable of recovering data do exist. :)

 

:duff:
Wonko
 

Thanks Wonko. That image was taken when our engineers working. Many many thanks for the feedback.



#4 misty

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Posted 2 weeks ago

Definitely worth the risk for me.

Wonko - I detect a hint of sarcasm in your response. :jaclaz:

Misty

#5 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 2 weeks ago

Thanks Wonko. That image was taken when our engineers working. Many many thanks for the feedback.

That engineer must have had some less than 9 years experience. :dubbio:
 
 

Wonko - I detect a hint of sarcasm in your response. :jaclaz:

 
Well, in my times there were 4 (four) Rules (+1, Rule #0) in data recovery :
0) You DO NOT open a disk in a non-controlled environment <- this is what is usually advertised as a "white chamber" but that 99% comes out being a laminar flow bench[1]
1) You DO NOT touch a platter with your bare hands
2) You DO NOT, DO NOT touch a platter with your bare hands, REALLY, you DO NOT!
3) You DO NOT have screws (removed from the disk drive) anywhere near the drive as it contains extremely powerful magnets
4) You DO NOT have steel tools (as example screwdrivers) anywhere near the drive (see Rule #3)
 
Of course times change and what once were basic Rules may well change according to changes in technology, so it is entirely possible that the above Rules don't hold anymore.
 
Still, the picture didn't convince me, since the proportions are "wrong".
 
If you hold in your hand (without opening it) a normal 3.5" disk drive, it will appear smaller than the one on the photo, or maybe your hand will appear bigger (and probably somehow your pinkies will look less "puffy" or "chubby"). 
 
SCOOP! :w00t:
 
We have a whole photographic sequence that nicely explains the apparent anomaly (and yes that  is a "stock photo") :
https://www.dreamsti...s-image35453225
:whistling:
 
I understand hiring young people :), but this seems like not fully compliant with SA 8000 ...
 
:duff:
Wonko
 
 
[1] surprisingly, such a bench NEVER, NEVER, NEVER has a wooden surface.



#6 erwan.l

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Posted 2 weeks ago

May be the OP is 9 years old ? ...

#7 steve6375

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Posted 2 weeks ago

I took some magnets out of a hard disk drive at work once and brought them home to show my 11-year old son.

He was fascinated at how powerful they were and played with them for ages (I had to watch him as he was putting them next to a colour CRT TV and watching how the colours changed the screen)!

 

The next day I got a call from his school - could I come and pick him up because he was involved in a small accident.

 

It seems that unbeknown to me, he took the magnets to school and to demonstrate how powerful they were to the other kids, he put one inside his mouth and the other on the outside of his cheek. And there they stuck! The teacher couldn't get them apart without inflicting severe pain. I managed to separate them using a few old plastic cards from my wallet without too much blood! After that he was fine!

 

So I don't advise putting children and strong magnets together!

 

 

 



#8 sbaeder

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Posted 2 weeks ago

Ah yes, those magnets can be fun.  I took apart an old drive to show the kids at a school what the inside looked like!  Those are tough to pull apart, and sliding them apart is the only way to go.  Glad he wasn't too badly injured!  (and it will be a great story to tell your grand-kids!)



#9 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 2 weeks ago

... (and it will be a great story to tell your grand-kids!)

It depends on points of view, the grand kids will love it, the son (i.e. father of the grand kids) won't. ;)

 

:duff:

Wonko



#10 DustinDeTorres

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Posted 2 weeks ago

It depends on points of view, the grand kids will love it, the son (i.e. father of the grand kids) won't. ;)

 

:duff:

Wonko

We are serving data recovery service since 1991. The old name of our company is Corporate Data Recovery. And now we combined few small data recovery company to provide service Nationally. The new Company Name is CBL Data Recovery Technologies. Hope that explain everything. :D



#11 Zoso

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Posted 2 weeks ago

hi all.

lol

back ups are good, and double back ups for critical data. avoid the hassle but if disaster strikes, ask reboot.pros first.

i sometimes buy old HDDs in bulk just for those magnets! very useful on automobiles, tool boxes, all sorts of ways.

I place them on engine oil pans, oil filers, transmission pans, differential covers, under hood and trunk so if/when i need to work on something there i can put the nuts/bolts or tools on them so they dont get lost or fall into an open engine.

theyre very useful. many cars have magnets in the transmission and diff. pans anyway to 'soak up' metal particulates from the fluids but the HDD magnets are much more effective for this than the OEM magnets.

#12 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 2 weeks ago

We are serving data recovery service since 1991. The old name of our company is Corporate Data Recovery. And now we combined few small data recovery company to provide service Nationally. The new Company Name is CBL Data Recovery Technologies. Hope that explain everything. :D

Does it explain why you used a stock photo of a child fiddling with a hard disk? :unsure:

 

Does it explain why - besides the "child" part - it depicts an operation that is a real NO-NO in any data recovery attempt? :w00t:

 

Does it explain why you - upon request - confirmed it to be a real photo of one of your engineers at work? :dubbio:

 

Seriously, if you had any credibility from the contents (mostly truisms) of that page/article, you managed to destroy each and every little bit of it by misrepresenting the source of that image. :(

 

Also - still out of curiosity - since 1991 as you just stated here or since 1993 as you stated here:

https://archive.org/...ry-Technologies

 

:duff:

Wonko







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