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Query Legacy BIOS from within Windows


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#1 grrrd

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 09:52 AM

I have multiple machines (capable of UEFI) but utilizing the legacy BIOS. What i need to find out, and ultimately change, is what the boot priority order is.

I would want to make PXE the primary boot option.

 

I have read this is possible with Dell and HP using their tools and powershell, referencing a 'namespace'. Problem is i am running this on a machine running a InsydeH20 bios.

 

Firstly are there any universal tools to read the options set in the BIOS and possibily amend them? Secondly is there a way to discover this illusive 'Namespace' and use the powershell to query its settings?

 

 

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks!



#2 Zoso_The_Internet_Tard

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 10:21 AM

I dont know about using PowerShell to do what you want, but you can try the steps on this page to determine if you are currently booting in legacy or UEFI mode:

 

http://kb.parallels.com/en/115815

 

The steps are for Mac users booting Windows, but the steps are the same. As for PXE, you should be able to set it in your BIOS, if such an option exists for you. You should also be able to view your boot order (HDD, optical, removable media, PXE, etc).


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#3 grrrd

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 10:55 AM

So yes - this confirms we are using BIOS for sure;

2015-07-07 13:16:06, Info                  IBS    Callback_BootEnvironmentDetect: Detected boot environment: BIOS

The query i need to be able to do is from windows - i have full remote control of the machines, but no vPRO/AMT access to check the BIOS settings remotely. So what i would require is a tool to query the bios settings to determine the boot sequence.



#4 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 12:50 PM

More or less, and in a nutshell, IF it can be done, rweverything can do it:
http://rweverything.com/

 

:duff:

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#5 grrrd

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 01:42 PM

Amazing tool, and a lot of information dumped from it - nothing obvious as of yet about boot sequence!

sent a email to the developer to see if they can assist.

 

Thanks



#6 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 07:47 PM

Amazing tool, and a lot of information dumped from it - nothing obvious as of yet about boot sequence!

sent a email to the developer to see if they can assist.

 

Thanks

Well the problem is that each BIOS have proprietary parts and is (or is it not) setup in a certain way.

 

What you can do on some HP's and Dell's it is because the compatible machine have a "so-called" instrumented BIOS or "SM Bios" (which is accessible via WMI through a specific CMI/OCMI, which is a sort of "driver" that provides extensions to WMI):
http://www.hofferle....ith-powershell/

 

The rweverything is more "low-level" it provides the binary data, and in some cases - like with the SM BIOS - it's interpretation/template, but not "specific methods", it is more like a disk/hex editor.

Maybe you can SAVE to file a SMBIOS binary twice, once with your "normal" boot sequence and once with PXE/network first and check the differences (checking also the "textual" .rw files). :unsure:

 

 

:duff:

Wonko


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