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What is a working windows 7 bootable flash drive of 256 gb?


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#1 cypherinfo

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Posted 15 July 2015 - 10:27 PM

Hello all,

 

this is my first post here so I ask you a little of comprehension.

I'm going to buy a windows bootable flash drive of 256 gb; I wonder what is the brand model that is tested to work well?

 

Thank you.

 

cypherinfo



#2 steve6375

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Posted 15 July 2015 - 10:49 PM

I would always advise a USB 3.0 Flash drive rather than USB 2.0.

 

There are two kinds of USB Flash drive, Removable and Fixed. The kind you want depends on what you are going to use it for.

Your post title says 'Windows 7 bootable' - do you mean you are going to run a Windows 7 OS from the USB Flash drive?

 

As for specific makes/models, I do not personally possess any flash drive over 64GB as I use USB 3.0 external HDDs for anything over 64GB.


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#3 cypherinfo

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Posted 15 July 2015 - 10:57 PM

Thank you for your interest. Yes an USB 3.0 removable flash drive; I'd like to try to run windows 7 on it.



#4 steve6375

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Posted 15 July 2015 - 11:01 PM

For Win 7 it is best to use a Flash drive of the Fixed Disk type.

Also, I would recommend Win8 or 8.1 rather than Windows 7, as Win7 requires a few tweaks to get it to work and even then it may not be very reliable - especially if you intend to boot from a variety of different systems.

Rather than buy an expensive 256GB USB Flash drive, why not buy a USB 3.0 external HDD?


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#5 Zoso_The_Internet_Tard

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Posted 15 July 2015 - 11:27 PM

Windows will, of course, refuse to install to any storage device connected via USB, regardless of whether it is a USB HDD or USB FDD. I'm not sure whether it will be seen as removable or fixed, this probably depends on what you choose. I would just choose an MBR partition on BIOS/MBR, trying to use UEFI on UEFI/GPT will add an unneeded level of complexity. You'll also have to deal with activation, I would download a volume licensing copy of 7/8/8.1/10 and activate with a KMS activator.

You'll need ImageX and bcdboot, at minimum, use GetWAIKTools to obtain them. I used the method at http://www.intowindo...rive-must-read/ a few years ago, it worked fine.

For MBR, create a single NTFS partition on your drive, mark it as active/bootable (MUST!), then use ImageX to deploy your install.wim, then use bcdboot to install boot files to that same partition. This is best done while not booted into Windows, instead boot into a Windows install USB. This will allow you to assign drive letter C to your target partition.

You can also try to create a Windows To Go USB, I think it's only available to be created with Win8/8.1 Enterprise, but there are workarounds to create it from another Windows OS.

You can install whatever Windows you want, but 8.1 will be the best and fastest for your purposes. A USB 3.0 drive is obviously recommended, otherwise everything will be slower than molasses flowing uphill on a cold day in hell. In 7 you have to manually install USB 3.0 drivers, 8/8.1 supports them out of the box, making it the superior choice.

I would go for something that's a minumum of 128GB. For HDDs, the only brand I can seriously recommend is Western Digital, I've had too many past issues with Toshiba and Seagate. For FDDs, Kingston or Samsung. Sandisk is fine too, but I had one dis on me well before its' estimated lifespan. You can also buy a regular 2.5" laptop drive and put it in a USB 3.0 enclosure, Samsung or HGST or WD for this. A SSD will also work, but you won't get anywhere near the max speed, so not optimal. I've only owned a Samsung SSD, never tried other brands, but it is proving to be very fast and reliable in the short time I've had it.


Edited by AnonVendetta, 16 July 2015 - 12:07 AM.

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#6 steve6375

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Posted 15 July 2015 - 11:41 PM

The WinToUSB site has some info and a free utility.



#7 dencorso

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 04:07 AM

Well, since nobody gave a direct reply, here is one:

The Kingston DataTaveler Workspace is, IMO, great. Of course, YMMV, in things like this... But, since you asked, here're my 2 ¢. I have a 64 GB unit and it's quite fast, too. It was designed for booting. Of course it's USB 3.0. And it has a Sand-Force controller. It's not exactly cheap, too, but it sure is way cheaper than the Super Talents, which are the only real competition, as far as booting goes. And, AFAIK, there's no 256 GB units, 128 GB being the max. size offered. Do you really need 256 GB? Are you sure?


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#8 cypherinfo

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 09:22 AM

Windows will, of course, refuse to install to any storage device connected via USB, regardless of whether it is a USB HDD or USB FDD. I'm not sure whether it will be seen as removable or fixed, this probably depends on what you choose. I would just choose an MBR partition on BIOS/MBR, trying to use UEFI on UEFI/GPT will add an unneeded level of complexity. You'll also have to deal with activation, I would download a volume licensing copy of 7/8/8.1/10 and activate with a KMS activator.

You'll need ImageX and bcdboot, at minimum, use GetWAIKTools to obtain them. I used the method at http://www.intowindo...rive-must-read/ a few years ago, it worked fine.

For MBR, create a single NTFS partition on your drive, mark it as active/bootable (MUST!), then use ImageX to deploy your install.wim, then use bcdboot to install boot files to that same partition. This is best done while not booted into Windows, instead boot into a Windows install USB. This will allow you to assign drive letter C to your target partition.

You can also try to create a Windows To Go USB, I think it's only available to be created with Win8/8.1 Enterprise, but there are workarounds to create it from another Windows OS.

You can install whatever Windows you want, but 8.1 will be the best and fastest for your purposes. A USB 3.0 drive is obviously recommended, otherwise everything will be slower than molasses flowing uphill on a cold day in hell. In 7 you have to manually install USB 3.0 drivers, 8/8.1 supports them out of the box, making it the superior choice.

I would go for something that's a minumum of 128GB. For HDDs, the only brand I can seriously recommend is Western Digital, I've had too many past issues with Toshiba and Seagate. For FDDs, Kingston or Samsung. Sandisk is fine too, but I had one dis on me well before its' estimated lifespan. You can also buy a regular 2.5" laptop drive and put it in a USB 3.0 enclosure, Samsung or HGST or WD for this. A SSD will also work, but you won't get anywhere near the max speed, so not optimal. I've only owned a Samsung SSD, never tried other brands, but it is proving to be very fast and reliable in the short time I've had it.

 

 

Well, since nobody gave a direct reply, here is one:

The Kingston DataTaveler Workspace is, IMO, great. Of course, YMMV, in things like this... But, since you asked, here're my 2 ¢. I have a 64 GB unit and it's quite fast, too. It was designed for booting. Of course it's USB 3.0. And it has a Sand-Force controller. It's not exactly cheap, too, but it sure is way cheaper than the Super Talents, which are the only real competition, as far as booting goes. And, AFAIK, there's no 256 GB units, 128 GB being the max. size offered. Do you really need 256 GB? Are you sure?

 


 

Windows will, of course, refuse to install to any storage device connected via USB, regardless of whether it is a USB HDD or USB FDD. I'm not sure whether it will be seen as removable or fixed, this probably depends on what you choose. I would just choose an MBR partition on BIOS/MBR, trying to use UEFI on UEFI/GPT will add an unneeded level of complexity. You'll also have to deal with activation, I would download a volume licensing copy of 7/8/8.1/10 and activate with a KMS activator.

You'll need ImageX and bcdboot, at minimum, use GetWAIKTools to obtain them. I used the method at http://www.intowindo...rive-must-read/ a few years ago, it worked fine.

For MBR, create a single NTFS partition on your drive, mark it as active/bootable (MUST!), then use ImageX to deploy your install.wim, then use bcdboot to install boot files to that same partition. This is best done while not booted into Windows, instead boot into a Windows install USB. This will allow you to assign drive letter C to your target partition.

You can also try to create a Windows To Go USB, I think it's only available to be created with Win8/8.1 Enterprise, but there are workarounds to create it from another Windows OS.

You can install whatever Windows you want, but 8.1 will be the best and fastest for your purposes. A USB 3.0 drive is obviously recommended, otherwise everything will be slower than molasses flowing uphill on a cold day in hell. In 7 you have to manually install USB 3.0 drivers, 8/8.1 supports them out of the box, making it the superior choice.

I would go for something that's a minumum of 128GB. For HDDs, the only brand I can seriously recommend is Western Digital, I've had too many past issues with Toshiba and Seagate. For FDDs, Kingston or Samsung. Sandisk is fine too, but I had one dis on me well before its' estimated lifespan. You can also buy a regular 2.5" laptop drive and put it in a USB 3.0 enclosure, Samsung or HGST or WD for this. A SSD will also work, but you won't get anywhere near the max speed, so not optimal. I've only owned a Samsung SSD, never tried other brands, but it is proving to be very fast and reliable in the short time I've had it.

 

 

Well, since nobody gave a direct reply, here is one:

The Kingston DataTaveler Workspace is, IMO, great. Of course, YMMV, in things like this... But, since you asked, here're my 2 ¢. I have a 64 GB unit and it's quite fast, too. It was designed for booting. Of course it's USB 3.0. And it has a Sand-Force controller. It's not exactly cheap, too, but it sure is way cheaper than the Super Talents, which are the only real competition, as far as booting goes. And, AFAIK, there's no 256 GB units, 128 GB being the max. size offered. Do you really need 256 GB? Are you sure?

 

Thank you for your detailed answers; 

I offer you free consultation as wizpert here: http://bit.ly/1N5l0gffeel free to contact me when you like.

I've found another option, expensive alas: http://www.spyrus.co...orkSafe Pro.pdf

Straight from the Windows to go website.



#9 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 12:20 PM

Maybe everyone here is making it more fussy than really needed, it is years since fujianabc posted the method and JFX created version 2 (and later) of the WinNTSetup tool :

http://reboot.pro/to...external-drive/

http://www.msfn.org/...nntsetup-v3811/

 

And the very few (possible) issues with USB vs, internal and Removable vs. Fixed have also been pretty much solved through the use of DiskMod:

http://reboot.pro/to...-usb-hard-disk/

 

@cypherinfo

The "high end" (please read as "very fast" and "very expensive") USB 3.0 sticks actually contain a USB to SATA bridge and a (miniaturized) SSD (like the one dencorso mentioned) and thus they are to all effects "Fixed", most normal USB 3.0 sticks are instead, like the good l' USB 2.0 ones "Removable", see:

http://reboot.pro/to...30-flash-drive/

 

A 256 Gb size (besides being extremely expensive) makes little sense (to me at least), given that a normal Windows 7 install (including all programs you may want/need normally) can be - say - 25 to 30 Gb, which would leave you with more than 200 Gb available for data, do you really need that much?

If yes, maybe it would be better (and cheaper) to get an external USB 3.0 enclosure and put in it a SSD.

 

:duff:

Wonko



#10 cypherinfo

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 05:31 PM

After your comments one (non said) thing is clear too; if you use a bootable  windows 7 usb pen drive you cannot use it as a normal pen drive for storing files.

 

@Wonko your http://reboot.pro/to...30-flash-drive/ is broken.

 

I wonder what are the pen drive (128GB/256GB) that are known will work after applying them the process to make them bootable?



#11 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 06:15 PM

What do you mean by "broken" ?

It works for me.

However:

http://reboot.pro/topic/19827-

this should work anyway.

 

And no, there is no reason why a bootable (windows 7 or other OS) USB stick can not also be used "normally" as data storage, simply a 256 GB USB stick is a ridiculously expensive piece of hardware so it is not particularly "smart" to buy one if you don' treally-really need that amont of data stored. 

 

There is not any (actually only a very little tiny bit of it ;)) "black magic" in making a USB stick bootable, it simply means making it a partitioned device, copying to it some boot code and making sure that the correct drivers are installed in the OS, the procedures are pretty much known and standard, the only issue may be (but nowadays is a rare case) on the actual computer side (as there are BIOSes that do no support USB booting or do not support it properly and need some "special" settings), but in the last 8 or 9 years we have seen them all and each and every tool/method has been modified to support almost *every* motherboard BIOS, sometimes needing an additional  trick or two.

 

 

:duff:

Wonko



#12 cypherinfo

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 07:08 PM

It seems there are not enough permissions to access your URL!?

Anyway I mean that once a pen drive has been made bootable cannot be inserted in an usb port to just store files.

 

 

Screenshot%202015-07-16%2021.05.25.png?d



#13 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 07:26 PM

 

Anyway I mean that once a pen drive has been made bootable cannot be inserted in an usb port to just store files.

I understand what you mean :), what I am telling you is that your is an unjustified assumption and actually far from representing the reality.

 

There is NO REASON IN THE WORLD why a bootable USB stick cannot be normally used, of course inserted in a USB port, to "just store files" on it, since, by your own statement this has NOT been said on this thread, you evidently assumed it by extrapolating or misreading some of the info posted, so that if you explain your way of reasoning, we can help you to find the fallacy in it.

 

Or, you can trust me that a making a USB stick stick bootable will not alter it's normal functioning as data storage media/device.

 

Still I am not sure what is the problem you are having in reaching this thread:

http://reboot.pro/to...30-flash-drive/

it in a normally available to all section of the board  :unsure: anyway, the relevant info is here:

http://reboot.pro/to...e-2#entry177221

Can you reach this latter post?

 

:duff:

Wonko



#14 cypherinfo

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 07:50 PM

The second URL is ok not the first one. A post in a forum is in itself a path where many peoples may share their information/opinions; it is a work in progress. New queries may arise; that is a great way to enrich all of ours knowledge.

You missed the point about what I said about the possibility to use a bootable pen drive normally sorry.



#15 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:45 AM

A post in a forum is in itself a path where many peoples may share their information/opinions; it is a work in progress. New queries may arise; that is a great way to enrich all of ours knowledge.

Really? :unsure:
How true. :smiling9: 
 

You missed the point about what I said about the possibility to use a bootable pen drive normally sorry.

The point is not about missing a point, it is about the non-existence of the point or if you prefer the pointlessness of your point, I now start understanding why you asked for patience/comprehension :frusty: .

:duff:
Wonko



#16 cypherinfo

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:47 AM

Really? :unsure:
How true. :smiling9: 
 

The point is not about missing a point, it is about the non-existence of the point or if you prefer the pointlessness of your point, I now start understanding why you asked for patience/comprehension :frusty: .

:duff:
Wonko

I'm sorry to see you don't like peoples with information opinion different from yours! :( You're just wrong.

I don't like to waste my time with this kind of comment.


Edited by cypherinfo, 17 July 2015 - 08:50 AM.


#17 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 09:34 AM

I'm sorry to see you don't like peoples with information opinion different from yours! :( You're just wrong.

I don't like to waste my time with this kind of comment.

Which is good, as it creates a nice, symmetrical situation. :)

 

The fact that a bootable USB stick can be used also normally "to just store files" is a (proven) fact.

Every other member of this forum has one or more bootable USB devices working normally  "to just store files", and you will find here tens or hundreds of thread/posts with related info.

 

Your opinion that it cannot is just your opinion, completely unsubstantiated, you are of course perfectly free to hold that (wrong) opinion, I was trying to highlight how, by your own statement,  you formed this (wrong) opinion by reading what was NOT written here.

 

Have a nice day, 

 

:duff:

Wokop



#18 karyonix

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 04:12 PM

Normally, Windows is installed in NTFS formatted partition and its root directory is protected by NTFS permission.
Programs must have Administrators privilege to save file in the root directory.
So normal program (such as notepad) run normally cannot save file to root directory.

In order to save data file to Windows partition, you have to
(1) create non-root directory and save file there
or
(2) "run as administrator" the program that will save file to root directory
or
(3) use Windows Explorer to copy file to root directory and provide Administrative right in UAC prompt
or
(4) edit permission of root directory.

Some users may "normally" throw files in root directory of USB flash drive from whatever program they run.
They cannot "normally" do this to the root directory of Windows partition.
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#19 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 07:07 PM

Some users may "normally" throw files in root directory of USB flash drive from whatever program they run.
They cannot "normally" do this to the root directory of Windows partition.

 

Sure :thumbsup:.

 

Those users may also fail at it on a "normal" NTFS volume (or succeed at it :)) there are more possible combinations of user permissions/privilege and ownership on a NTFS volume than stars in the sky:

http://superuser.com...drive-with-ntfs

 

There are reasons why both "normally" and "just store files" were (and still are) inside double quotes.

 

To me "normally" implies using "normally" Windows Explorer (which is the "normal" file manager) to "just store files" and "normally" be prompted for UAC if the destination requires Administrator privileges, and "normally" consent to it or "normally" change permissions/ownership on the target as seen fit.

 

Maybe we should define "normal" and "normally" (besides "just store files") :dubbio:

 

:duff:

Wonko






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