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Migrate Win7 between PCs without Migration Tools

vhd os migration win7 migration tools

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#26 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 06:25 PM

@Wonko

Dude, maybe I didn't use right word. But I explained on what things I meant. Sorry. :)

No prob whatsoever. :)

(nice wiki paste)

I don't get it. :unsure:

:cheers:
Wonko

#27 sambul61

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 01:35 PM

JFYI, if you compare the "features" of NTFS (or of the "next" protogon) with the features of a Registry file, a number of common points will be evident. A (NTFS) filesystem is a Database, not necessarily an OO one, though.

Why would you think so - any prove?

Actually, MS developed WinFS was going to provide an object-oriented database driven access layer to the NTFS file system. It would mean developers could do some cool things with database-like queries of the file system. This seems to show, NTFS is a simplified OODB with very basic structure and query functionality. In fact, in current OS disks can be indexed and searched based on file content, which seems to indicate partial WinFS code integration.

"Many filesystems found on common operating systems, including the NTFS filesystem which is used in modern versions of Microsoft Windows, store files and other objects only as a stream of bytes, and have little or no information about the data stored in the files. Such file systems also provide only a single way of organizing the files, namely via directories and file names"

#28 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 03:32 PM

I guess there is a misunderstanding. :unsure:

IMHO *any* filesystem is a Database.

To me a database is *anything* that "stores" more than one item and that can access these items through one (or more) indexes or queries.
When you do:

DIR C:*.txt

you are actually doing a "query" against the filesystem database and the result is the "fields" Date/Time/Size/Filename of all items that correspond to three criteria:
  • files that are in the ROOT of C: volume
  • files that are not hidden
  • files that have an extension .txt

When you do:

@SETLOCAL ENABLEEXTENSIONS&@FOR /F %A IN ('DIR /B C:*.txt') DO @IF %~zA leq 10000 ECHO %A


you are doing a more sophisticated query, and get as a result only the name(s) of file(s) that correspond to the above mentioned criteria AND that are smaller than 10000 bytes.

So, a filesystem, *any* filesystem, is a database. (you can do the same on FAT filesystems, as an example)

Where is the border between a "generic" database and a OO one, is in the eye of the beholder.

Whether the tools to make queries on the database contents exist, are convenient to use, etc., is another thing.

The point I was trying to make is - no matter whether NTFS or the Registry files/hives are OO or not - they are very similar and they are a database.

You should avoid to misquote me, I posted:

A filesystem is a Database, not necessarly an OO one, though.

and not what you quoted, adding the (NTFS) which was NOT what I wrote (nor what I meant).

:cheers:
Wonko

#29 sambul61

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 04:02 PM

A file in NTFS is referenced as an object with multiple descriptors. However, NTFS provides very limited options to query its OO database. :)

Returning to the subject of this thread, a GUI tool to visually compare content of different versions of Windows Registry would be utmost handy in the OS migration task, since it'd allow to compare registries content when the same OS is installed on different PCs, and then use acquired knowledge to prepare an OS volume for migration to other PCs. Especially important for limited adjustability OS like Embedded, Compact or Thin Client Windows versions, which have a hard time discovering new devices during boot and installing proper drivers for them. In fact, they might not have any spare driver stock to install new drivers to begin with.

#30 sambul61

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 08:19 PM

Some Guides suggest to switch off Windows Updates, Paging, Firewall, and delete "unneeded" files and folders to keep OS smaller before migration. Sure, if you want to expose your system to all kind of attacks by even simplest exploits and block possibility of future updates, do that. But if you want to learn more about the purpose of some OS folders like dllcache before deleting them, read these interesting articles: :)

Windows XP File Protection feature WFP

The Secret Of Windows 7 WinSxS Folder

Windows Installer folder : delete, or not to delete - that is the question!





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