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Booting via USB-HDD connected to Ethernet


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#1 mactepu

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 12:51 PM

Hi guys...I need help...I dont know if I'm posting in the right place... :dubbio:

I have an old laptop Toshiba Satellite A60-S166 with ACPI BIOS (I have updated to latest version 1.90 provided in Toshiba's site) it only have four boot options...HDD, CDROM, FDD (USB-FDD Legacy Emulation), and LAN (PXE)...it does not have option to boot from USB-HDD or USB-ZIP.

It cannot detect internal 30GB HDD anymore, and I think the internal HDD has broken...I have Seagate GoFlex 500GB USB-HDD and I want to be able to install OS in my USB-HDD and boot from it instead of using LiveCD...I have :confused1: around but cannot find solver to my problem...(as posted here).

I have installed Ubuntu 10.10 on USB-HDD on another laptop and successfully boot from it, but I still cannot boot my old Satellite A60-S166 above.

I was thinking of using 44-pin 2.5" IDE Laptop Male to Male Cable (above image), to convert USB-HDD into IDE device and make it look as internal HDD. I have searched around any stores but they don´t have the cable.
Spoiler


Since my Satellite A60-S166 can boot via LAN (PXE), can I use USB-RJ45 Connector (above image) connected directly to my USB-HDD and Ethernet, and boot via PXE? And make new OS installation?
Spoiler


Thanks in advance :confused1:

Edited by mactepu, 23 January 2011 - 12:53 PM.


#2 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 01:26 PM

mactepu

With all due respect, you CANNOT "convert" anything to anything else without a CONVERTER.
What you posted are "cables" or "adapters" they simply "extend" a connection to a slightly further place or change the connection into another connection pinout/standard connector.
The general idea of the first is mostly PONTLESS.
(the ONLY use it has is, if you have a 44 Pin *something* with a FEMALE connnector and you wish to connect it to the connector on the laptop (which is also FEMALE)
In your laptop there is a female 44 pin connector but ANY hard drive has a male connector.
The general idea of the second is for technicials that carry with them a number of adapters, including usually an USB type A extension cable, male/male to use it as a temporary (and for short connections only) RJ45 cable.

To PXE boot you need a PXE server.
There are devices (routers usually) that provide this:
http://pxe.dev.above...apable_Hardware
but normally a PXE server is another PC on the network.

the quick (and not so dirty) solution for your problem is to replace the broken hard disk.

:confused1:
Wonko

#3 Sha0

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 02:35 PM

You could put PLoP on a floppy or CD/DVD and boot it. It should then allow you to boot from an attached USB storage device. You might try it out; pretty simple test.

Like Wonko already said, PXE requires a server on the same network. If you're talking about your home, this mightn't be ideal unless you have a computer to function as such a [DHCP/PXE] server.

#4 mactepu

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 03:05 PM

mactepu

The general idea of the first is mostly PONTLESS.
(the ONLY use it has is, if you have a 44 Pin *something* with a FEMALE connnector and you wish to connect it to the connector on the laptop (which is also FEMALE)
In your laptop there is a female 44 pin connector but ANY hard drive has a male connector.

Thank you for the reply...
The idea is like this :
Mainboard ----> 44-Pin Male <--another end--> 44-Pin Male ----> 44-Pin Female-USB Converter <--another end--> USB-HDD, is it possible? :confused1:

You could put PLoP on a floppy or CD/DVD and boot it. It should then allow you to boot from an attached USB storage device. You might try it out; pretty simple test.

Like Wonko already said, PXE requires a server on the same network. If you're talking about your home, this mightn't be ideal unless you have a computer to function as such a [DHCP/PXE] server.

Thank you for the reply...
I´ve tried using PLoP on a CD but it cannot boot to my USB-HDD, it freeze everytime... I have contacted the author and asked, even he cannot find the solution, he stops replying :dubbio:
I think I will leave PXE as it is, as I realized that PXE boot requires IP address :confused1:

#5 Wonko the Sane

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 03:32 PM

Thank you for the reply...
The idea is like this :
Mainboard ----> 44-Pin Male <--another end--> 44-Pin Male ----> 44-Pin Female-USB Converter <--another end--> USB-HDD, is it possible? :thumbsup:

I don't think so. :confused1:

The "female" side of a IDE to USB converter (or Sata to USB one), i.e. the actual "USB converters" you may find expect a hard disk, not a motherboard.

In other words, I highly doubt :confused1: that those are bi-directional. (please read as "they are NOT" :dubbio:)

UNLIKE (say) a PATA/IDE to SATA converter (or viceversa) where there are SOME converters that are bi-directional, it is not possible for the USB converters.
In other words PATA and SATA use mainly the same "ATA/ATAPI" protocol or "set of commands" but with a different connection/interface, so it is possible (and there are several such converters) to make "transparent" converters that can also be bi-directional.
An USB converter expects to be interrogated by the bus on the USB side (the VID, PID, etc.) and it's controller interrogates the attached device (on the PATA/IDE or SATA side).

:whistling:
Wonko

#6 sambul61

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 04:37 PM

mactepu

I wonder if you have a router model where OpenWRT or DD-WRT 3-d party GUI firmware can be installed (many are supported by these FWs)? These are usually a lot more capable than factory FW and desirable to install anyway, and could allow to add PXE server to the router. Then you can try booting from your USB & HDD if present on LAN (it can also be connected to another device on LAN). A bonus is, once you master that, it might also be possible to add a torrent client to that router, thus allowing you to download large torrents to the same HD, while your PC is asleep.

#7 mactepu

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 02:38 PM

I don't think so. :w00t:

The "female" side of a IDE to USB converter (or Sata to USB one), i.e. the actual "USB converters" you may find expect a hard disk, not a motherboard.

In other words, I highly doubt :rofl: that those are bi-directional. (please read as "they are NOT" :cheers:)

UNLIKE (say) a PATA/IDE to SATA converter (or viceversa) where there are SOME converters that are bi-directional, it is not possible for the USB converters.
In other words PATA and SATA use mainly the same "ATA/ATAPI" protocol or "set of commands" but with a different connection/interface, so it is possible (and there are several such converters) to make "transparent" converters that can also be bi-directional.
An USB converter expects to be interrogated by the bus on the USB side (the VID, PID, etc.) and it's controller interrogates the attached device (on the PATA/IDE or SATA side).

:cheers:
Wonko

Thanks, Wonko man :w00t:...I got your point, didnt notice the bi-directional part :ph34r:

mactepu

I wonder if you have a router model where OpenWRT or DD-WRT 3-d party GUI firmware can be installed (many are supported by these FWs)? These are usually a lot more capable than factory FW and desirable to install anyway, and could allow to add PXE server to the router. Then you can try booting from your HD if present on LAN. A bonus is, once you master that, it might also be possible to add a torrent client to that router, thus allowing you to download large torrents while your PC is asleep.

My router is TP-Link TLWR841N, I think it can use 3rd party DD-WRT but will void the warranty as TP-Link announced:

TL-WR841N
¨ *Some official firmware of TP-LINK products can be replaced by the third party firmware such as DD-WRT. TP-LINK does not provide technical support and does not guarantee the performance and stability of third party firmware. Damage to the product as a result of using third party firmware will void the product's warranty. ¨






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